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The 2003 Prairie Garden: Themes and Extremes

The 2003 Prairie Garden:
Themes and Extremes


The 2003 Prairie Garden, featuring "Themes & Extremes," should prove to be an inspiration to gardeners who wish to include plants that are just out of reach of their zone or to those that want to know how to create a theme to run throughout the garden or landscape.

Our guest editor, Linda Stilkowski writes the weekly Prairie Gardener column for the Winnipeg Free Press, but still found time to write about the trials of gardening with man's best friend. Another article discusses a creature not quite so welcome to gardeners - the slug. She unravels the mystery of horticultural Latin names and tells us why it makes sense to use these unpronounceable words in lieu of common names.

The colour section has a new look but still includes an abundance of colour photos to inspire readers to try unusual plants, or combinations of plants, in their area. There are articles that describe how to grow unusuals such as figs, thistles and water plants. Bouquet gardens, boulevard gardens and lazy gardens provide interesting reading and the difficulties of gardening in the north, at the cottage and in the Chinook zone will keep you entertained and provide valuable information. An article on how one man's passion for lilies turned his retirement into a full time business is a fascinating read. Did you know some of your blooms are edible? Learn which ones you can add to your plate for an attractive and tasty treat.

The General Gardening section looks at bats, butterflies and lady beetles along with individual articles on Easter lilies, grapes, valerian, hop and baneberry to name but a few. Canada's new plant hardiness zone map is featured but take care, there are some cautions you should be aware of and you will find these inside The Prairie Garden's pages. This year's winner of The Prairie Garden Award for Excellence gives some insight into the origins of familiar plants after touring China and yet another article looks at agricultural life in Manitoba long ago. This issue also examines the how-tos of starting a club and facilitating a garden tour. Be prepared to be entertained and enlightened by the 2003 edition of The Prairie Garden.

This is the 64th issue of this digest-sized gardening annual. The Prairie Garden Committee, composed entirely of volunteers, is pleased to make this publication available to people who garden in the prairies and beyond. The writers, professional and amateur alike, come from a variety of horticultural backgrounds and provide an interesting mix of articles. Examine the Table of Contents for the 2003 issue to find out who this year's authors are, and more. Please use the Order Form to order this issue to complete your reference library. These small garden books make wonderful gifts.
 
 


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